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Marijuana is worse than alcohol

Regulation of alcohol does not keep alcohol out of the hands of children and teens. So when pro-pot people came up the idea “Regulate Marijuana like Alcohol,” they should have known that part of the plan would not be successful either.  Just ask any teacher in Colorado. As propagandists push marijuana to achieve equality with alcohol in American life, here’s a look at how they compare:

1) According to a report in 2015, 30 % of marijuana users in the United States qualify as having Cannabis Use Disorder, vs. 10-20% of those of drinkers who are alcoholics. 

2) A study from the University California, Davis found that in terms of downward social class mobility, financial difficulties, antisocial behaviors in the workplace and relationship conflict, cannabis dependence was worse than alcohol dependence. 

3) With THC (most psychoactive part of pot) as high as it is today, there is no equivalent to dope that is like beer or wine. Since competition between growers has created the higher THC,  consumers won’t go back to the weak, old-fashioned pot that was in existence before the “medical marijuana” scam was introduced in the mid-90s. Average THC in Colorado is 20% vs. 1-3% in ’70s.

4) Frequent users of marijuana are more likely to have a-motivational syndrome, compared to frequent drinkers.

5) Students who are heavy weed users are much more likely to drop out of school than students who drink heavily.  After all, weed is nicknamed “dope” for a reason.  According to a major study in the Lancet Psychiatry Journal, frequent cannabis users are 60% more likely to drop out of high school than non-users.

6)  Teens who use marijuana are 3x more likely to overdose on other drugs such as heroin; teens who use alcohol are 2x more at risk for overdose with other drugs.  While marijuana may not be a “gateway” for every young person who does pot, the risk of leapfrogging to other drugs is greater for those who use marijuana.

7) Both are readily available to children and teens. Pot is more available in marijuana states, as the parents may have it at home.

8) Both are dangerous for driving, and both have led to traffic fatalities, particularly when the drivers are age 25 and under.   Looking at the absolute evidence takes away any need for studies to show that driving stoned is dangerous.

9) Marijuana stays in system longer, up to a month and even more for chronic users, while alcohol goes out of the system in 24 hours.  Some marijuana users experience flashbacks which can be very dangerous while driving or when they come on unexpectedly.

10) There are high-functioning alcoholics and there are regular marijuana users who hold jobs and function reasonably well.  The latter is less frequent, and those who manage well tend to give an erroneous impression to others who become addicted quickly and show a greater impairment from using pot.

11) Both marijuana and alcohol are depressants. 

12) Marijuana causes paranoia, anxiety and mental health problems at much higher rates than alcohol.

13) Marijuana advocates claim it is “harmless” and “not addictive,” both false claims.  They also claim to drive better while stoned.  Drinkers , on average, are not so delusional in claiming that alcohol is harmless and non-addictive.  Individual problem drinkers may deny that they have a problem, while pot activists deny marijuana is a problem.

14) Binge drinking in very, very heavy doses can lead to death. While marijuana doesn’t go into the brain stem, in heavy doses it can lead to psychosis.  Pot has been know to cause death for those who have a psychotic reaction to marijuana, or heart arrhythmia or cannabis hyperemesis syndrome.

15) You can’t smoke or vape alcohol, so it doesn’t carry the sames risks to your lungs that marijuana does. 

16) Marijuana doesn’t cause a hangover.  Skipping the headache is not a good reason to do pot.  Just don’t drink or drink less.  😉

For another view of this issue, read When a Lie Travels: Comparing Alcohol to Marijuana.  Read another article we wrote on marijuana vs. alcohol.

No one is forced or compelled to drink, another falsehood promoted by the marijuana lobby.  Many adults choose not to drink or do any drugs.   More power to them.

Former Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman said legalization “wasn’t worth it.”  Colorado’s former governor John Hickenlooper said that legalization was “reckless.”  In the state of Washington the number of crashes involving marijuana-impaired drivers doubled after legalization.

About 10-14% of the US uses marijuana, compared to up to 60% of adults who use alcohol.  Evidence shows that marijuana users drink more alcohol, too.

Rip the Pot Van Winkle wakes up

When I was 17 my BFF Lisa was in a single car accident.  She was prone to smoking bong hits and driving with her knees.  She was in a coma for a year and died.  I first smoked pot with her and her mom. Lisa was her only child. 

I blamed a faulty car for her death, not pot.

In my 30s, I partied with a young 20s co-worker from UMass.  She had smoked strong pot, AK-47 for years.  I stopped hanging out once she became paranoid, delusional and agoraphobic.  She later was in a mental hospital for schizophrenia and has been on disability ever since. 

I blamed her genes for her debilitating mental illness, not pot.

The rose colored glasses of denial.

I dated a patient,  also named Lisa, at the dispensary who had extreme psychotic episodes whenever she smoked high potency Sativa.  She would almost collapse, regress into a two-year-old state of mind, scream at the top of her lungs and then go into loud, joyous religious rapture singing.  

The scariest experience was when in psychosis she uttered in a guttural deep voice so unlike her’s, “Choke her!”  It was an alarming Sybil Stephen King moment that sent chills down my spine. I didn’t know if her split personality was talking about choking herself or me. 

Needless to say, it was very hard being with her, we were not a good match whatsoever and broke up.  I later learned that she committed suicide at 52. 

I blamed her diagnosis of bipolar for her suicide, not pot.

Rip the Pot Van Winkle

Bong rips: “A noun that refers to the action of smoking from a bong. So named for the sound that air makes when it bubbles through the bong water.”

One time in college my friends had too much water in a bong – really dirty, unchanged, high potency bong water.  The too high water level caused me to unintentionally swallow a huge mouthful of bong water when I released the carburetor.   
 
I immediately started to hallucinate, almost passed out.   Was lucky to stay conscious long enough to make it to the bathroom and vomit profusely.  Took a heck of a long time for my mind to clear and body to recover.  But I saw no problem with continuing to use pot.

For years I discounted all of those signposts showing that marijuana is dangerous  because I was so enmeshed in my pot denial.

When, finally, I experienced such terrible physical and mental effects myself, this Rip the Pot Van Winkle woke up out of a pot slumber.  The truth could no longer be denied. Horrible psychosis woke me up.  I am SO lucky I survived.

I had the epiphany that pot caused my BFF’s death via DUI; pot caused my friend to become schizophrenic, and pot caused psychosis and suicide with my ex-girlfriend.  Pot caused me to think violent thoughts like shooting people, and brought me to the brink of suicide.

Pot almost took me out.  I couldn’t perceive the damage because I was high on pot.  

By Anne Hassel,  a new friend of Parents Opposed to Pot.

 

Marijuana killed my son David in only a couple of years

Our son’s story is a warning to other parents

Our son was happy and healthy before he started using marijuana at age 14.  A friend introduced him to marijuana during a time when our family was supporting my wife in her fight against breast cancer.  We noticed David changing rapidly, but attributed the change to   puberty. 

After being kicked out of the private school he had attended for many years, he became a heavy user and seemed to lose motivation for school and for life. He graduated from high school at the bottom of his class and started work as a plumber’s assistant. With his paychecks, he would buy more weed.

As his use became even heavier, he became increasingly removed from our family. He spoke of seeing aliens. By last Thanksgiving he appeared catatonic. The next day he stabbed his right palm with his pocket knife. He was hospitalized in a local mental health facility and diagnosed with depression and psychosis, and only tested positive for marijuana. 

After a 6-day inpatient stay, David was discharged with no discharge planning. Notes from the facility reveal that David filled out a questionnaire on the day of discharge expressing that he “often” felt panic or terror and that he had made plans to end his life. This was not made known to the family, and he was discharged anyway.  

After discharge he started an outpatient program. On the fourth day he smoked cannabis in the woods behind our house. Then he came inside, got a gun from the safe and shot himself.

Marijuana kills! It killed my son. We will never escape David’s loss, but we hope that by telling his story we can help other parents and children understand that marijuana is far from harmless.   (We published a testimony by David’s sibling who described the effects of his death on the family.)

We have other articles that explain how the mental health system often fails in treatments for marijuana addiction, part 1.  Mental health care fails at addiction treatment, part 2

Large new study shows teen cannabis use risk for later depression

Leaders of the Parents Movement of the late 1970s and 1980s feared their children’s pot use led to apathy, lower grades and other drugs. The old concerns remain, but the new anti-pot Parents Movement warns more about the fact that marijuana may lead to severe forms of mental illness.  A new study confirms that teen marijuana use increases depression and the risk for suicide in young adulthood.

According to the study, the odds of developing depression are 37% higher in young adults up to age 32 who used marijuana as teens, compared to those who did not. The odds of a young adult thinking about suicide were 50% higher in those who smoked pot as teens. The odds of a suicide attempt were almost 3.5 times higher in the pot smokers versus those who didn’t use marijuana. Continue reading Large new study shows teen cannabis use risk for later depression