Category Archives: Drug Policy

Provocations: Suppressed marijuana story (DAVID NEESE COLUMN)

New Jersey’s state government routinely ignores its complaining citizens. But can it ignore itself?

Published in The Trentonian, December 27, 2020.   A lawsuit challenging the legality of the recent state ballot question legalizing marijuana may answer that question.

The lawsuit declares that the state misled the public with the wording of the ballot question and ignored scientific evidence on the harmfulness of marijuana. It seeks to have the legalization declared “null and void.”

Whatever the outcome of the lawsuit, this much is clear beyond any dispute: New Jersey’s state government takes flagrantly contradictory positions on marijuana. Continue reading Provocations: Suppressed marijuana story (DAVID NEESE COLUMN)

Kim Foxx’s Solution is Worse than the Problem

Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx  works on finding ways not to hold people in Chicago accountable for egregious mistakes. Her administration makes it legally acceptable to commit some crimes, including shoplifting and theft of less than $1000. Making drug crimes ok is her latest campaign. Continue reading Kim Foxx’s Solution is Worse than the Problem

Passing MORE Act means 6,800 more deaths a year

The MORE Act, which may be voted on by the full House this week, would legalize marijuana nationally.  But it also could lead to upwards of 6,800 more traffic deaths a year, as well as other problems.   Please write Congress to say NO to the MORE Act, and no to MORE deaths.  (The MORE Act would go far beyond  decriminalization and lead to national legalization.)

A Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) study showed how statistics from the first four states to legalize pot, could be used to estimate the increase of traffic fatalities if we adopted national legalization.  These deaths are preventable. 

Recent events show how marijuana worms its way out of regulation.   Yesterday San Francisco City Council voted to ban smoking in apartment buildings, but excluded marijuana. According to AP: “The original proposal sought to ban residents from smoking marijuana in their apartments, but supervisors voted to exclude marijuana after cannabis activists said the law would take away their only legal place to smoke. It’s illegal under state law to smoke cannabis in public places.”

California residents who voted on Proposition 64 believed that children would not see billboard advertising. However, the industry pushed for it and the industry got it.  Fortunately, a judge ruled that the billboards violate the proposition.  

Colorado allows billboard advertising for marijuana, but the city of Denver does not.  State regulatory bodies give extraordinary privilege to the sellers of this dangerous drug, even though tobacco advertising on billboards is not allowed and even though selling the drug goes against federal law.   

Yesterday a marijuana delivery driver was robbed and beaten in Maine. Despite Maine’s small, carefully designed marijuana program, assaults on marijuana deliveries occurred three times. A drug that makes users violent and promises the industry huge profits cannot be “regulated.”

Medical Societies of five states speak out against marijuana legalization

Recently the medical societies of Delaware, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania joined together to express mutually shared concerns about efforts to legalize marijuana by state governments. Also in late October, the family of a California woman brought a wrongful death lawsuit against the maker of an edible product bought at a San Diego pot shop.

Legalization continues to present serious public health concerns.  The societies issuing the warning represent tens of thousands of physicians. Their statement echoes our view that marijuana legalization is an anti-science policy. Continue reading Medical Societies of five states speak out against marijuana legalization