Category Archives: Drug Policy

Politicians play into Koch vs. Soros models of pot legalization

Politicians take sides when it comes to marijuana legalization. A Koch model believes that marijuana legalization offers new ways to make money (good for the economy), while a Soros model wants to undo the “war on drugs,”   which the US abandoned long ago.  Read Part I.   Follow us by email to get our blog articles.

The first two states to legalize, Colorado and Washington, may illustrate the differences.  Colorado has always been a libertarian free-for-all of legalization.  (However, Colorado has been forced to put warning labels on products over 10% THC, resulting in the largest downturn ever seen.

Washington State, on the other hand, used an ACLU lawyer to write its ballot and Soros bankrolls the ACLU.  The ACLU cares deeply that minorities are incarcerated at higher rates than white Americans.

However, Washington may have to crack down on its marijuana industry too.  A leaked scientific report from Washington recom-mends raising the age requirement for high-potency products to 25.
Continue reading Politicians play into Koch vs. Soros models of pot legalization

Soros vs: Koch: Competing Models for Marijuana Legalization

Over the past 30 years, George Soros has spent about $100,000,000 of his own money to legalize marijuana.  Charles Koch, of Koch-brother fame, is also in the game.   Americans deserve to know how much megadonors control our daily lives. 

For parents fighting to save kids from drug addiction and pay for treatment, we’re perplexed at their callous indifference to our plight.

The pollsters offer a selling point for legalization, too, claiming that 70% of the country supports legalization.  However, both Pew and Gallop Polls come out inaccurate, because they don’t word the question properly.  They never ask whether people prefer decriminalization or legalization.

What is the difference between the Koch and Soros programs?  While Charles Koch supports the market-based model for legalization, Soros regularly supports the candidates who are part of the Progressive movement within the Democratic Party.  

Regardless of which roadmap a state follows to legalization, all roads lead to monopolies.   (We will show this conclusion in a two-part series. Subscribe to our blog to read Part II) Continue reading Soros vs: Koch: Competing Models for Marijuana Legalization

SAFEBanking ACT won’t make cannabis shops safer

If the SAFEBanking Act passes in the Senate, it won’t stop the violent break-ins at marijuana dispensaries. Senators have been led to believe that break-ins are primarily for cash. Break-ins in pot shops are primarily for the products, particularly high-potency THC!

“TACOMA — The method is the same each time: A stolen car slams through the entrance of a marijuana shop, shattering glass and scattering debris everywhere. A group of masked thieves rushes in, ransacks the place and flees in another stolen car.”   

The above describes recent break-ins between Olympia and Tacoma, Washington, 5 of which occurred during the last week of October.

It’s model across the country in 2022, and the SAFEBAnking Act won’t change it.  Please oppose the SAFEBanking Act by using the attached form and sending it to your Senator.

Continue reading SAFEBanking ACT won’t make cannabis shops safer

Raising Lazarus Describes Continuing Overdose Crisis

Beth Macy’s Raising Lazarus is the latest book on the overdose crisis.  Unfortunately, this insightful journalist who wrote Dopesick, made into a series on Hulu, is a harm reductionist who doesn’t put too much stock in primary drug prevention.    

Drug policy should have three prongs: Prevention, Recovery and Harm Reduction.

Instead of tirelessly stating “Let’s stop stigmatizing addiction,” why can’t we say, “Let’s celebrate recovery”?  

We need to incentivize recovery.  

The drug epidemic has been running for more than 20 years now, and today the primary driver is fentanyl, an opioid sold on the black market. An estimated 107,000 died of overdose last year.  Why is it only getting worse? Perhaps it’s because we’re addressing the problem with harm reduction only and not spending much money on drug prevention. In the case of fentanyl, youths are going right from marijuana use to buying pills that are laced with fentanyl and dying immediately.  In pot legalization states out west, it currently is happening to those as young as 13 and 14.

Macy’s view of marijuana is a blindspot

Macy scorns Nancy Reagan and her “cabal of marijuana-hating moms” on p. 77.  But does she realize that the parents movement of 1979-1992 brought down drugs use from 39% of all teens to 14%?   The parent movement, which included black activists, was an exceptional achievement.  We could do the same now, if only  harm reduction were not the primary leg of drug policy. Continue reading Raising Lazarus Describes Continuing Overdose Crisis