Tag Archives: National Families in Action

What is the evidence for medical marijuana to treat the addiction epidemic?

The Marijuana Policy Project promotes their drug as a substitute for opiate pain pills.  Like the worst offenders in the opiate industry, the cannabis lobby follows an addiction-for-profit business model. Their master plan needs 80% of the demand to be met by 20% of the users.  Science shows no evidence for using medical marijuana as a substitute for pain pills.

Governor David Ige of Hawaii wisely refused to cave to lobbyists, and he vetoed a measure that would have allowed medical marijuana to treat opiate addiction.

A large-scale, major study from Australia Continue reading What is the evidence for medical marijuana to treat the addiction epidemic?

Has the “Medical” in Marijuana Qualified Pot for Rescheduling?

Marijuana Lobby Depends on Selling a Lie to Pull off a Scam

If you tell a lie long enough, people start believing it’s the truth.   We found a  “medical” marijuana box  in the middle of the soaps and toiletries of a gift shop in a state where lobbyists have been trying to commercialize “medical” marijuana through the state legislature.   Marked “For Daily Use Only,” it gives the appearance of necessity, much like a pill box.  The marijuana industry is finding good ways to trick the public into believing marijuana is “medicinal,” just as the tobacco industry claimed cigarettes were healthy.  However, there are 450,000 marijuana-related hospitalizations in the US each year.*

This summer the head of the DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration) said he would be making a decision about rescheduling marijuana which would mean a change from Schedule 1 to Schedule 2.   However, this past week a federal magistrate judge in New York rebuffed a challenge to federal laws which place marijuana among the most dangerous drugs.

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Under the lid of the “medical” marijuana box in a Shenandoah Valley, VA gift shop. Virginia has a limited medical marijuana program and doesn’t allow joints to be smoked is “medicine.”  There was a petition to fire the DEA Administrator for calling “medical” marijuana a joke, but who can claim this box is anything other than a joke?

It should be no surprise, as Judge Kimberly Mueller made a similar ruling against rescheduling in April, 2015. Her decision followed a Court ruling of January 2013, which followed many years of studying the issue, by the DEA, with input from the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services.

The Ruling of July 12 in New York

In his ruling, U.S. Magistrate Judge Jonathan Feldman said, “There can be no dispute that public opinion on whether marijuana has legitimate medical uses is changing in this country.”  But Feldman ruled that Charles and Alexander Green, two brothers accused of marijuana trafficking, had a to prove that current federal laws are “so arbitrary and irrational as to be unconstitutional.”

The Greens, who are from California, are accused of major roles in a marijuana trafficking operation that brought the drug into western New York. They have challenged how federal law classifies marijuana, in the same category as heroin. The category known as “Schedule 1” drugs suggests Congress and federal authorities consider it among the nation’s most dangerous illicit substances.

Marijuana, as a plant or a weed, is not medicinal.  Derivatives may have medical application, but those are derivatives of the plant not marijuana.   National Families in Action put a good explanation of the difference between marijuana and marijuana-based medicines.

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NORML always planned to use the medical idea as a scam to advance the cause of legalization. The DEA is expected to make an announcement about rescheduling marijuana this summer.

It is possible that the DEA may reschedule cannabidiol, one of the cannabinoids in marijuana, which gives relief to some children with seizures.  Today’s high-THC marijuana has lower proportions of CBD than the marijuana of the 60s, 70s and 80s, which makes marijuana far more dangerous, on par with heroin.  (Any medicine derived from a plant does not go by the plant name, but the marijuana lobby tries to mislead the public into confusing the extract from the plant.)

Quotes by leaders of NORML reveal that medical marijuana was planned as a scam from the start.  On February 6, 1979, at Emory University, Keith Stroup said:  “We are trying to get marijuana reclassified medically.  If we do that, we’ll be using the issue as a red herring to give marijuana a good name.”  Richard Cowan and Ed Rosenthal followed up with statements saying that getting people to buy into the idea of medical marijuana and getting hundreds of thousands to do it will be the key to getting full legalization.   Watch the video.    

*Information comes from checking the long DEA report that was available online until recently showed a growing number of hospital treatments for marijuana up until 2010. Obviously, it is more now.  Here is the summary available online.

Right to Know if CBD for Epilepsy Doesn’t Always Work

Don’t  Mislead About CBD for Epilepsy

(First of 2 articles on deceptive practices of the marijuana lobby/industry) Doesn’t the public have a right to know that children a so called”life-saving” product doesn’t always work.?

CBD, a cannabinoid used for seizures that is derived from marijuana, doesn’t always save children’s lives.   The TRUTH is that help from CBD oils is sometimes temporary.   There’s definitely a “dark side” to this “miracle” cure.

Informing parents that children can die after using the non-pharmaceutical CBD is not suggesting that the CBD kills; it is merely suggesting that to call it “life-saving” is misleading.  Parents who have watched their children suffer much and are desperate for a cure should not be promised more than can be given.  What sounds too good to be true can be too good to be true.

A family in Arizona who was part of a lawsuit to get the extracts for their son saw a dramatic difference in the boy, an improvement in all levels of functioning.  Nonetheless, the poor boy died. The family still advocates for marijuana extracts.  They saw their son have a better life for a period of time before his death.

A girl who had been the poster child for medical marijuana recently died.  She no longer needed a wheelchair after moving from Connecticut to Maine for CBD.  (GW Pharmaceuticals Epidiolex is for Dravet Syndrome, which Cyndimae had, and for Lennox-Gestaut Syndrome).  It is estimated that 85% of patients with Dravet Syndrome survive to adulthood, although life expectancy is not well understood.

One child who moved to Colorado for the CBD medication got help, but still died.  The mother returned home alone.   The medical marijuana industry doesn’t tell you that sometimes these “miracle cures” don’t work.

Why are People, Legislators Shielded from the Whole Truth?

In March, 2016,  GW Pharmaceuticals announced results from the third phase of its trials of Epidiolex, a pharmacy grade cannabidiol derived from marijuana.   If approved by the FDA, it will be the first marijuana-derived medicine for seizures to get approval.  Trials are being conducted by the Epilepsy Center of New York University.

Recently parents came out in droves to lobby for medical marijuana in Pennsylvania, spending the night at the state legislature.  Had these parents been told that children with seizures could have participated in the trials conducted at New York University?  At the time, GW was looking to recruit 150 more patients for the second part of the third phase of trials on Dravet Syndrome.

Medical marijuana campaigns don’t always supply the whole truth, especially when there’s much drama surrounding the presentation.  When Dr. Sanjay Gupta went on television with his special segments about marijuana, he publicly advocated for “medical” marijuana using the example of Charlotte’s Web, an artisanal CBD product from Colorado.  The televised documentaries were called Weed 1, Weed 2 and Weed 3.

At the end of Weed 3, it was mentioned that Vivian, the little girl whose family moved to Colorado for an extract of marijuana not available in New Jersey, was no longer being longer being helped as much as she had been previously.   Were people listening?

Why Support Artisanal CBD?

National Families in Action (NFIA) published the American Epilepsy Society’s statements against artisanal CBD.   NFIA has written about the advantages of having pharmacy-grade, FDA-approved medicine over artisanal products, which haven’t been tested for mold or pesticides and may not have the same exactitude in dosage.

Like the “Right to Know” campaign on GMOs, shouldn’t there be a Right to Know about CBD oil advocacy, or a “Right to Know about “medical” marijuana?

Parents  who are considering alternative treatments for devastating diseases or conditions have a right to know that some of the  experimental medicines that are aggressively promoted do not always save a child’s life.  These preparations should never be called “life-saving,” because no one can prove that phrase to be true.

“Medical” marijuana has succeeded in shielding itself from lawsuits in ways that pharmaceutical companies would never be able to do.

We will continue with articles on how the medical marijuana lobbyists mislead people and manipulate legislators.

National Families of Action States Marijuana Policy

National Families in Action (NFIA) weighs in on the legalization of marijuana with three basic positions:

1) Replace incarceration for low level drug offenders with assessment, treatment for those who are addicted, and education and social services for those who are not.  Children and teens who are caught using are best served by get help, not punishment.

2) Any medical marijuana program should be based on public health models.

3) Recreational marijuana is not a good idea.  If marijuana is legalized the best way to do it and prevent youth usage is to follow the precedent set by Dr. Kessler to regulate tobacco.

Teen Usage (2)National Families in Action (NFIA) was founded in Atlanta in 1977, to protect children from drugs.   It led a national effort to help parents  prevent the marketing of drugs and drug use to children and helped them form parent groups to protect children’s health.

Today NFIA publishes the weekly Marijuana Report, an update on major news affecting marijuana across the US.  NFIA has worked continuously for many years.    Tobacco and alcohol cause enough problems in the US and it’s unwise to add a third addictive drug. NFIAAmericaondrugs

Since National Families in Action has been studying Colorado, what has been found?  The more medical marijuana dispensaries, the more adolescent marijuana use.

“Colorado legalized medical marijuana in 2000 but only legalized cultivation and dispensaries in 2009, giving rise to an explosion of dispensaries in some areas of the state. Colorado legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, but legal pot shops did not open until January 1, 2014.

“In 2013, Colorado initiated the Colorado Healthy Kids Survey of some 40,000 middle-school and high-school students. It divided the state into 21 regions, releasing statewide data in September 2014 but regional data quite a bit later.

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“Nationwide press coverage proclaimed that one year after full legalization, Colorado high school students’ marijauna use (36.9%) was lower than the national average (40.7%). But that wasn’t the whole story, illustrated (by the graphic linked above). Use is considerably higher than the national average in some regions, considerably lower in others. Why?

“There are nearly twice as many dispensaries in regions where use is higher, and that’s before recreational pot shops opened for business. In the past, we have shown that states with the highest youth marijuana usage also have the highest usage of opiate, heroin and cocaine abuse.   It also tends to happen in states where “medical” marijuana is legal.

What will the 2015 Colorado Healthy Kids Survey show?”    Thankfully, a few non-profits have been formed in order to educate and prevent marijuana from getting into the hands of children. Smart Colorado and Parents for a Healthy Colorado have stepped up the plate and are trying to fill a gap in substance abuse education.  Project SAM is very active in Colorado, also.

In Oregon, Clear Alliance has formed and is working to educate in anticipation of a of that state’s legalization that begins July 1.

National Families in Action co-founded the Addiction Studies Program for Journalists with Wake Forest University School of Medicine in 1999.    With demonstration grants from the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention in the 1990s, the organization worked with families in inner-city Atlanta public housing communities to help parents protect their children from the crack epidemic and to help parents and teachers conduct an after-school program, Club HERO, for sixth-grade students at a large, inner- city middle school.